decryption

PGP Cryptography With The Legion of the Bouncy Castle – Part 5

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We’re back! Back to PGP Cryptography tutorials!! Because when I want to learn something new I learn faster by writing a tutorial about it, sharing code and receiving feedback.

So in Part 4 I apologized that I did not have a lot of time and just showed how to integrate Bouncy Castle with Android by using SpongyCastle. Now I will go through how to generate and verify detached signatures. This has become important since Part 2 did teach how to sign and verify files, but the signature was embedded inside the file. Though this works, it did not work when trying to verify the file using a regular program like GPG / Kleopatra. Also not all PGP clients support ZLIB compression which could break compatibility. So I decided that the need to generate detached signatures was important.

Continuing with the previous examples we have the PGPTools file which I wrote to make cryptography easier with BC (Full source can be found here). Generating a detached signature file needs the following:

  • The file you want to sign
  • The name of signature file that will be generated
  • The PGP Key ring that contains your secret and public keys

Another interesting thing to know to go by is the naming convention of these files. Most programs look for it and makes it easier for the user to utilize and for programs to find. Supposed there is a file called “TheFile.txt”, below is how the signature file would be named:

  • ASCII Armored Signature: TheFile.txt.asc
  • Binary Signature: TheFile.txt.sig

This is not mandatory, but a nice convention to follow.

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PGP Cryptography With The Legion of the Bouncy Castle – Part 3

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Continuing my 5 part series on using the Bouncy Castle API to create your own Java library to manage Private / Public key pairs. Part 2 went over digitally signing and verifying messages using the generated key pair from Part 1. Also, just a note, the signature generation from Part 2 are not detached signatures, they’re embedded within the information. I’ll talk about why I prefer to do this when we get to Part 4.

Encryption is done using the recipients public key and does not require us to enter a pass phrase. When the recipient receives the encrypted message they will need to enter their pass phrase in order to decrypt the message. This is mainly so because their public key is protected by password based symmetric encryption inside the key ring.

Below we add the encrypt and decrypt methods to our PGPCryptoTools source file.

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